Bold look resurfacing

Perhaps a bit lower rise and slimmer fit than it was before, but it's coming back nonetheless. And as much as I've been a fan of narrow (but not skinny) lapels and ties for a while, I think this is a good change of pace.

Tom Ford is leading the charge, as always, with his wide peak lapels, pocket flaps, and ties paired with trim fitting jackets and trousers. Though I think his own jacket fits need some help (particularly the collar gapping and button pulling) and the trouser rise could stand to be an inch or two higher, I'm pretty okay with his default style. When the narrow, narrow, NARROW trend was in full force in 2008, his clothing in Quantum of Solace showed that traditionally masculine proportions were still relevant. It says something that the suits, shirts, and ties still look fresh seven years later. Only now are the fashionistas realizing that the very tight cuts were never flattering on anyone -- too late, as always. Tom Ford seems to agree, thinking that super skinny fits and micro-lapels look like you're cutting costs on fabric. (Worth noting that he only developed the Skyfall suits under orders from Jany Temime. The fit is not at all his preference.)

From the set of Spectre. Still a bit tight, but overall it fits Craig's mesomorphic build much better.

Besides suits, high semi-spread and spread collars with longer points seem to be getting a little more love now. Certainly, they look better than any number of really tiny point collars young celebrities have been wearing in the last several years, though the high stand looks better on men six feet and taller or those with long necks. You can see such an example in the Sebastian Ward collar shape, which is semi-cutaway. What I'm most attracted to now are the collars that have longer points and almost look like semi-spread collars due to the slope. Such an example is below.

A very nice looking long point, tall band spread collar from Proper Cloth.

Now you may ask, "Why the sudden interest in wider stuff?" Well, I've always had an interest (much of my early clothing knowledge came from looking at 1930s stuff) but recently found that, contrary to the common claim that skinny guys need skinnier ties and lapels, it suits me and my body proportions better. As it does most men, really. There is nothing particularly wrong with narrow ties and lapels, so long as they don't get downright anemic. But this rediscovery has me making use of long-abandoned ties in my collection from around 8-10 years ago, when 3.75" was still standard. I'm sure the average male office worker will be relieved that his old ties didn't have to go to Goodwill, as well.

I personally can't wait until fashion shifts even more this direction. It will make shopping for my body type and preferences a lot easier.

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